Seasonal Topics

Beat the Heat with this Safety Cheat Sheet

Keeping You and Your Crew Safe As the summer months get into full swing, heat stress and other heat-related illness become a concern for workers across the country.  Heat stress can lead to heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, or heat rashes.  Heat can even increase the risk of injuries in workers since it can lead to sweaty palms, fogged-up safety glasses, or dizziness. Workers at risk of heat stress may include: Outdoor Workers Workers in hot environments Firefighters Bakery workers Farmers Construction workers Miners Boiler room workers Workers at an increased risk of heat stress also include those: Who are 65 years of age or older Are overweight Have heart disease or high blood

Winter Injuries: Frostbite & Hypothermia

Winter Injuries: Frostbite & Hypothermia While winter activities such as skiing, sled riding, and making a snowman can be enjoyable; they also can pose a threat if you are not aware of the risks.  Some tips to keep in mind before endeavoring into the winter wonderland we call earth are: Check the temperature and limit your time outdoors if it’s very cold, wet or windy Bundle up in several layers of loose clothing Wear mittens rather than gloves Cover your ears with a warm hat Wear socks that will keep your feet warm and dry Frostbite and hypothermia are the consequences of being exposed to the cold and can have some serious effects.  While running

By |2018-08-24T16:07:01+00:00December 27th, 2017|Blog Articles, Seasonal Topics|

Fall Prevention Awareness Week

Fall Prevention Awareness Week Did you know that the leading cause of death for construction workers are falls? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 350 of the 937 construction fatalities in 2015 were caused by falls from elevation. However, the construction industry is not the only sector of work where falls are considered to be a danger. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), most general industry incidents involve slips, trips, and falls as well. They cause 15% of all accidental deaths and are second only to motor vehicle incidents for causing fatalities. Furthermore, all of these deaths from falling are preventable and can be avoided by these steps. Importance of Training First, training

By |2018-07-31T00:08:25+00:00September 15th, 2017|Blog Articles, Construction, Safety Management, Seasonal Topics|

Electrical Safety Month

May is Electrical Safety Month Electrocutions Are One of OSHA's Fatal Four Did you know that three of the ten most violated (and cited) OSHA standards involve electrical safety? In fact, “Electrocutions” are one of OSHA’s Construction Fatal Four. The Fatal Four is a list of hazards that accounted for over 64% of fatalities in the construction industry in 2015. Of the construction fatalities, 8.6% of them dealt with electrocutions. Focus on Prevention The following are some ways to prevent run-ins with electrical hazards: Make sure your lockout/tagout program is up to date. Routinely inspect extension cords and electrically powered tools for wear and tear.

By |2018-07-31T21:01:30+00:00May 3rd, 2017|Blog Articles, Safety Management, Seasonal Topics|

Springtime Hazards on Construction Sites

Springtime Hazards on Construction Sites As springtime starts to spring this year, everyone is excited to get out to the jobsite and enjoy the nice weather. However, it is important to think about what changes are happening on your construction site. Most of the country experienced one of the coldest and harshest winters in decades. This severe cold has caused the soil to heave up to an elevation that is higher than it was in the autumn. Now as the spring thaw starts, the soil will start to go back down to its normal elevation, which can cause unexpected hazards on your jobsite. So what’s the big deal? When scaffolding or shoring is bearing on

By |2018-08-23T03:27:59+00:00March 24th, 2015|Blog Articles, Construction, Safety Management, Seasonal Topics|

Fall Into Safety

With the weather cooling down and the leaves changing colors, there are hidden dangers lurking outside. Slips, trips, and falls are prevalent during this season due to the rain and leaves residing on the ground. The good news is these accidents can be prevented with a little housekeeping. Make sure to rake leaves from the yard and driveway. The roadways can also be slick, so it is advised to slow down and make sure you check your car’s breaks and tires. Inspect the treads on your tires to make sure they are still good; you don’t want to have a bald tire which can cause your car to slide. Your car needs traction to stay

By |2018-08-23T16:05:24+00:00September 24th, 2014|Blog Articles, Safety Management, Seasonal Topics|