Safety Management

Confined Spaces: Seeing Beyond the Entry

When it Comes to Confined Spaces, There’s No Room to Skip on Safety Precautions. In January 2017, a utility worker in Key Largo, Florida, opened a manhole cover and went under a recently paved section of road to investigate why it had settled unevenly. When he stopped responding to coworkers above ground, a second worker went in to see if he needed help. When both stopped responding, The Washington Post reported, a third man entered. What none of these workers knew is that years of vegetation had been rotting underneath the surface, creating a poisonous gas. All three workers were overcome by hydrogen sulfide and methane, causing them to asphyxiate.  These three men lost

By |2019-07-22T15:04:26+00:00July 22nd, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

How to Rebuild Your Safety Program After an Accident

How Would You Recover From an Accident? When an accident on the job site occurs, it affects everybody. It’s an emotionally-charged time full of “what ifs” that forces everybody involved to face the reality that everything can change in an instant. But what follows is equally stressful because accidents and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) go hand-in-hand. Following an accident, companies often must work under the scrutiny of safety officials, operating with the knowledge that one violation could cripple the business. It is an unenviable position to be in.  That is exactly what happened to Mark Mashuda Excavating Inc. back in March of 2015. Emergency Can Strike at any Time While doing

Get Your Safety Goals in Shape

Are Your Safety Goals Feeling Like a Doctor's Visit? Nobody really likes going to the doctor, but having a regular checkup by a qualified physician is important. Not only can checkups help identify an issue before it becomes a bigger problem, but your doctor will also give you instructions on a variety of lifestyle changes such as exercise and a sensible diet as daily maintenance so you stay healthy. However, all of that doesn’t matter if the patient doesn’t follow through with the plan that has been put in place. Why Inspections Can Be Crucial for Success The same holds true for having safety inspections in the workplace. The initial inspection will identify safety issues

By |2019-06-12T12:28:59+00:00June 11th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

Mental Health in the Workplace

A Trillion Dollar Topic Considered a taboo subject in the workplace 30 years ago — something that was talked about in hushed tones around the water cooler and often referred to incorrectly as “a nervous breakdown” — the truth is that anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders are no longer looked upon with the same scrutiny as years past. Mental Health challenges are now recognized as very real, very treatable, and things very normal people deal with. Fortunately, there is a wealth of options available these days to help people overcome these issues, but getting employees to actually use these resources can prove difficult. According to the World Health Organization, more than 300 million

OSHA’s National Emphasis Programs

High Risk Industries OSHA is Targeting for Inspections Many have heard about National Emphasis Programs (NEPs), but few actually understand just how far-reaching these programs are and what they are actually designed to accomplish. These are temporary programs that allow OSHA to concentrate their resources on specific hazards, both existing and new, in an effort to curb and hopefully eliminate the rate of occurrence. By using the latest data and resources available to evaluate specific hazards and focus on solutions, the goal is to identify potential risks and put protocols in place to secure the safety of the workplace. OSHA provides compliance assistance resources in the form of printed, online, video and audio instruction on

By |2019-04-22T20:41:20+00:00April 22nd, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Who Pays for Personal Protective Equipment?

OSHA PPE Rules Answered Who pays for PPE? The employer or the employee? Since 2004, Lancaster Safety consultants have conducted nearly 12,000 OSHA-compliance training sessions with companies in all fifty states. In virtually every one of those training sessions, one question arises more frequently than any other. Who Pays for Safety Gear? Is the employer responsible for providing pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE)? Or is the employee?  OSHA has a 48-page guide that provides guidance to employers for evaluating PPE needs. It addresses the proper selection, maintenance, and training necessary to protect employees from a variety of hazards. While the actual assessment and evaluation of PPE can be complicated and complex, when it comes

By |2019-05-30T19:22:10+00:00March 28th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

The Importance of Facility Safety Inspections

Mock OSHA Facility Inspections Save Worker Lives & Millions in Lost Profit When an explosion occurred in a plant in Corrigan, Texas, severely burning a man, it took four years for the courts to make their decision. When they did, the verdict was staggering.  The court awarded the plaintiff $39.7 million for pain and suffering. It was April 26, 2014 when Ralph Figgs’ life changed forever. He was working at a Georgia-Pacific plant when a dust collection system failed, causing the explosion that permanently injured Figgs, killed two of his fellow workers, and injured several others. In all, three companies were held at fault. Along with Georgia-Pacific, a company called Aircon Inc., which designed and installed

By |2019-05-17T19:54:06+00:00February 27th, 2019|Blog Articles, General Industry, Safety Management|

Comply with New York City Local Law 196

What is New York City Local Law 196? 2017 was a tragic year in the construction industry for New York City and all over the United States. Ten people died in falling-related accidents on construction sites in 2017, according to reports filed with New York City’s Department of Buildings. New York City Council proposed Local Law 196 in 2017 to prevent additional worksite fatalities. In October 2017, the measure was signed into law, gradually phasing in more robust workplace safety rules. Who Needs to Comply? All construction and demolition workers on site-safety jobs in New York City. Safety & Health Training Required  As of December 1st, 2018,

By |2019-06-10T14:04:41+00:00February 25th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Recordkeeping & Reporting FAQs

Updated January 2019 What's Recordable? Each year, OSHA requires certain employers to complete the OSHA packet and have the 300A Summary form posted by February 1st. Filling out the OSHA 300 packet and also trying to determine what is, or is not considered a recordable injury can be confusing at times. For this reason, Lancaster Safety Consulting, Inc. (LSCI) hosts an annual Recordkeeping webinar which is available for free! Register for one of our webinars today by clicking here. Must-know OSHA Recordkeeping Basics: Q: Where can I find the OSHA Recordkeeping Packet? A: Download it here! Q: When does the OSHA 300A form need to be posted? A: February 1st to April 30th Q: Who is required to maintain injury and illness records? A: Employers

By |2019-01-15T14:23:39+00:00January 14th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Top 5 Most Common Recordkeeping Mistakes

Recordkeeping Requirements Apply to Most Business in the United States OSHA requires employers who had 11 or more employees at any time during the calendar year to keep a record of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. These injuries and illnesses are recorded on 300 Logs, and if you’re an employer who is required to complete them, you may be already be aware of how to complete them. However, below are some common mistakes that employers make regarding recordkeeping. Let's start the countdown with the top 5 most common recordkeeping errors we see as Safety & Health Professionals: 1. Forgetting to Post the OSHA 300 A Form Employers who are required to complete 300 Logs

By |2018-12-28T21:54:34+00:00December 27th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|
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