OSHA News

OSHA’s National Emphasis Programs

High Risk Industries OSHA is Targeting for Inspections Many have heard about National Emphasis Programs (NEPs), but few actually understand just how far-reaching these programs are and what they are actually designed to accomplish. These are temporary programs that allow OSHA to concentrate their resources on specific hazards, both existing and new, in an effort to curb and hopefully eliminate the rate of occurrence. By using the latest data and resources available to evaluate specific hazards and focus on solutions, the goal is to identify potential risks and put protocols in place to secure the safety of the workplace. OSHA provides compliance assistance resources in the form of printed, online, video and audio instruction on

By |2019-04-22T20:41:20+00:00April 22nd, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Comply with New York City Local Law 196

What is New York City Local Law 196? 2017 was a tragic year in the construction industry for New York City and all over the United States. Ten people died in falling-related accidents on construction sites in 2017, according to reports filed with New York City’s Department of Buildings. New York City Council proposed Local Law 196 in 2017 to prevent additional worksite fatalities. In October 2017, the measure was signed into law, gradually phasing in more robust workplace safety rules. Who Needs to Comply? All construction and demolition workers on site-safety jobs in New York City. Safety & Health Training Required for NYC Local Law 196 As of December 1st, 2018, for all

By |2019-05-03T17:41:29+00:00February 25th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Maximum OSHA Fines are Increasing in 2019!

The Maximum OSHA Penalty is Increasing Again in 2019 Until four years ago, OSHA had not raised their penalty amounts since 1990. Now, with the Inflation Adjustment Act, OSHA is required to annually adjust penalty amounts by January 15th. Fines increased by approximately 80% on August 1, 2016 and are adjusted annually moving forward. Listed below are the current OSHA penalty amounts for 2019. This year the penalty increase adjusted on January 23, 2019 due to the government shut downs. The Best Way to Avoid OSHA Fines is a Proactive Workplace Safety Culture! Be proactive, rather than reactive, when it comes to your company’s safety and health program. First start a Safety Committee and began creating

By |2019-05-17T20:14:10+00:00January 27th, 2019|Blog Articles, OSHA News|

Recordkeeping & Reporting FAQs

Updated January 2019 What's Recordable? Each year, OSHA requires certain employers to complete the OSHA packet and have the 300A Summary form posted by February 1st. Filling out the OSHA 300 packet and also trying to determine what is, or is not considered a recordable injury can be confusing at times. For this reason, Lancaster Safety Consulting, Inc. (LSCI) hosts an annual Recordkeeping webinar which is available for free! Register for one of our webinars today by clicking here. Must-know OSHA Recordkeeping Basics: Q: Where can I find the OSHA Recordkeeping Packet? A: Download it here! Q: When does the OSHA 300A form need to be posted? A: February 1st to April 30th Q: Who is required to maintain injury and illness records? A: Employers

By |2019-01-15T14:23:39+00:00January 14th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Top 5 Most Common Recordkeeping Mistakes

Recordkeeping Requirements Apply to Most Business in the United States OSHA requires employers who had 11 or more employees at any time during the calendar year to keep a record of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. These injuries and illnesses are recorded on 300 Logs, and if you’re an employer who is required to complete them, you may be already be aware of how to complete them. However, below are some common mistakes that employers make regarding recordkeeping. Let's start the countdown with the top 5 most common recordkeeping errors we see as Safety & Health Professionals: 1. Forgetting to Post the OSHA 300 A Form Employers who are required to complete 300 Logs

By |2018-12-28T21:54:34+00:00December 27th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

OSHA Requirements Guide for Employers

What Does OSHA Require From Employers? If you have ever visited OSHA's website, you know there is so much information posted regarding the different safety and health requirements employers must follow in order to keep their employees safe on the job. We are going to breakdown the key rules and regulations starting with the top 3 basic duties for employers. Three Key Elements: Compliance with OSHA laws. Provide a workplace free from serious recognized hazards. Examine workplace conditions to ensure compliance. The foundation of a successful safety program is compliance with OSHA laws. Part of the LSCI approach is to stress the importance of creating a good safety culture at your workplace.

By |2019-05-07T19:36:49+00:00August 15th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

OSHA’s Beryllium Final Rule

 Are You Exposed? What is Beryllium? Beryllium is a lightweight but extremely strong metal. Beryllium-copper alloys are widely used because of their electrical and thermal conductivity, hardness, and good corrosion resistance. Beryllium oxide is used to make ceramics for electronics and other electrical equipment because of its heat conductivity, high strength and hardness, and good electrical insulation. Metal slags and fly ash (a byproduct of coal-fired power plants) may also contain trace amounts of beryllium (<0.1% by weight). Who is Exposed? According to OSHA, around 62,000 workers are exposed to beryllium on the job. The most common industries that use beryllium include:   Aerospace   Telecommunications   Electronics   Medical   Energy   Defense OSHA's

By |2018-09-11T21:12:07+00:00July 3rd, 2018|Blog Articles, OSHA News, Safety Management|

OSHA 10/30 Hour Requirements

DOES OSHA REQUIRE 10/30 HOUR TRAINING? Answer: No. To date, federal OSHA has not required employees to obtain their 10 or 30 hour OSHA outreach certification card.  ARE THERE ANY STATES THAT HAVE 10/30 HOUR TRAINING CARD REQUIREMENTS? Answer: Yes. Certain states do have 10 and/or 30 hour training, expiration, and renewal requirements. Please read below to see what the different requirements are for each state and contact us if your company is in need of either a 10 or 30 hour certification class or renewal.  We have OSHA-authorized trainers available nationwide and would recommend taking the training class in-person rather than online! OSHA 10 hour cards do not expire but certain states listed below do

By |2019-03-19T16:15:19+00:00February 5th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Trump Administration’s Effect on OSHA in 2017

The Trump Administration’s Effect on OSHA in 2017 With the 1st anniversary of the Trump Administration taking office recently passing, we thought it would be a good idea to reflect on the changes that the administration made to the agency who was created to assure safe and healthful conditions for working men and women – OSHA. Fewer Regulations In January 2017, an executive order was signed, which required federal agencies to cut two regulations for every new one proposed. This executive order was later clarified to only apply to those regulations with a proposed cost of $100 million or more. The purpose of this order is to ensure that the cost of new regulations be

By |2018-07-30T23:52:13+00:00January 25th, 2018|Blog Articles, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Can You Be OSHA Certified?

OSHA Certified? OSHA’s training requirements are in accordance to the safety and health hazards that employees are exposed to on the job. We often hear this misconception that OSHA requires employees to be OSHA certified. While there is no such thing as an ‘OSHA Certification’ there are various levels of training for employees and supervisors. OSHA Training Institutes (OTI) and Education Centers offer available outreach courses including 10 and 30-hour trainings in Construction, General Industry, Maritime Industry, and Disaster Work. These outreach trainings are not a certification program but they can allow a safety professional to become an OSHA Authorized Trainer by completing the appropriate courses (click here to learn more). OSHA Authorized Trainers can

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