Construction

Mental Health in the Workplace

A Trillion Dollar Topic Considered a taboo subject in the workplace 30 years ago — something that was talked about in hushed tones around the water cooler and often referred to incorrectly as “a nervous breakdown” — the truth is that anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders are no longer looked upon with the same scrutiny as years past. Mental Health challenges are now recognized as very real, very treatable, and things very normal people deal with. Fortunately, there is a wealth of options available these days to help people overcome these issues, but getting employees to actually use these resources can prove difficult. According to the World Health Organization, more than 300 million

OSHA’s National Emphasis Programs

High Risk Industries OSHA is Targeting for Inspections Many have heard about National Emphasis Programs (NEPs), but few actually understand just how far-reaching these programs are and what they are actually designed to accomplish. These are temporary programs that allow OSHA to concentrate their resources on specific hazards, both existing and new, in an effort to curb and hopefully eliminate the rate of occurrence. By using the latest data and resources available to evaluate specific hazards and focus on solutions, the goal is to identify potential risks and put protocols in place to secure the safety of the workplace. OSHA provides compliance assistance resources in the form of printed, online, video and audio instruction on

By |2019-04-22T20:41:20+00:00April 22nd, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Who Pays for Personal Protective Equipment?

OSHA PPE Rules Answered Who pays for PPE? The employer or the employee? Since 2004, Lancaster Safety consultants have conducted nearly 12,000 OSHA-compliance training sessions with companies in all fifty states. In virtually every one of those training sessions, one question arises more frequently than any other. Who Pays for Safety Gear? Is the employer responsible for providing pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE)? Or is the employee?  OSHA has a 48-page guide that provides guidance to employers for evaluating PPE needs. It addresses the proper selection, maintanance, and training necessary to protect employees from a variety of hazards. While the actual assessment and evaluation of PPE can be complicated and complex, when it comes

By |2019-05-17T19:40:58+00:00March 28th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

Comply with New York City Local Law 196

What is New York City Local Law 196? 2017 was a tragic year in the construction industry for New York City and all over the United States. Ten people died in falling-related accidents on construction sites in 2017, according to reports filed with New York City’s Department of Buildings. New York City Council proposed Local Law 196 in 2017 to prevent additional worksite fatalities. In October 2017, the measure was signed into law, gradually phasing in more robust workplace safety rules. Who Needs to Comply? All construction and demolition workers on site-safety jobs in New York City. Safety & Health Training Required for NYC Local Law 196 As of December 1st, 2018, for all

By |2019-05-03T17:41:29+00:00February 25th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Recordkeeping & Reporting FAQs

Updated January 2019 What's Recordable? Each year, OSHA requires certain employers to complete the OSHA packet and have the 300A Summary form posted by February 1st. Filling out the OSHA 300 packet and also trying to determine what is, or is not considered a recordable injury can be confusing at times. For this reason, Lancaster Safety Consulting, Inc. (LSCI) hosts an annual Recordkeeping webinar which is available for free! Register for one of our webinars today by clicking here. Must-know OSHA Recordkeeping Basics: Q: Where can I find the OSHA Recordkeeping Packet? A: Download it here! Q: When does the OSHA 300A form need to be posted? A: February 1st to April 30th Q: Who is required to maintain injury and illness records? A: Employers

By |2019-01-15T14:23:39+00:00January 14th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Top 5 Most Common Recordkeeping Mistakes

Recordkeeping Requirements Apply to Most Business in the United States OSHA requires employers who had 11 or more employees at any time during the calendar year to keep a record of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. These injuries and illnesses are recorded on 300 Logs, and if you’re an employer who is required to complete them, you may be already be aware of how to complete them. However, below are some common mistakes that employers make regarding recordkeeping. Let's start the countdown with the top 5 most common recordkeeping errors we see as Safety & Health Professionals: 1. Forgetting to Post the OSHA 300 A Form Employers who are required to complete 300 Logs

By |2018-12-28T21:54:34+00:00December 27th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

First Aid/CPR Requirements for Employers

Does OSHA Require First Aid/CPR Training? Many employers today wonder what the requirements are when it comes to training their employees in First Aid/CPR. Is it, or is it not required? Will employers be held liable or at fault if none of their employees are trained? What is the right thing to do? Many other questions that arise regarding training employees in First Aid/CPR are based off of the distance and time it would take medical services to get to a facility. In some cases, businesses are right next to a first responder, and in other cases it could take over 30-minutes for any emergency services to arrive. So, does everyone have to be

By |2018-12-28T22:05:56+00:00December 19th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

How Loud is a Construction Site?

Are You Protected Against Construction Site Noise? It’s no surprise that a construction site is one of the noisiest places to be in. While it may be a fleeting annoyance for pedestrians and passersby, construction noise impacts over 10 million construction workers on a daily basis. Sound intensity is measured in units called decibels (dBA). Prolonged exposure to sounds above 85 decibels can damage hearing and increase the likelihood of permanent hearing loss. According to Washington University’s Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Services, construction workers are exposed to over 85 dBA for 70% of their daily shift. Despite the hazards, construction workers report only wearing hearing protection devices for less than 20% of the

By |2019-04-18T20:28:17+00:00November 28th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, Safety Management|

OSHA Requirements Guide for Employers

What Does OSHA Require From Employers? If you have ever visited OSHA's website, you know there is so much information posted regarding the different safety and health requirements employers must follow in order to keep their employees safe on the job. We are going to breakdown the key rules and regulations starting with the top 3 basic duties for employers. Three Key Elements: Compliance with OSHA laws. Provide a workplace free from serious recognized hazards. Examine workplace conditions to ensure compliance. The foundation of a successful safety program is compliance with OSHA laws. Part of the LSCI approach is to stress the importance of creating a good safety culture at your workplace.

By |2019-05-07T19:36:49+00:00August 15th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Crisis Response

Crisis Response that is Fast, Effective, and Direct Crisis response means taking action. It is the ability to be strategic with your response plan through careful monitoring and following through with established response protocols. You'll never be able to predict when a crisis will occur, but you can identify certain scenarios and plan how to appropriately respond in each type of event. Whether it’s a fire, unresponsive employee, chemical spill, active shooter, extreme weather, or a major machinery failure, the speed of your response and the actions you take may also turn into a Public Relations (PR) crisis, if mishandled. It’s important to pay attention to what is going on and use real time communication

By |2018-08-09T16:37:16+00:00August 9th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|
Load More Posts