What is BBS and HOP?

Cutting Edge Concepts in Safety

Behavior-Based Safety (BBS)

Behavior-Based Safety (BBS) can be defined as “A process that creates a safety partnership between management and employees that continually focuses people’s attentions and actions on theirs, and others, daily safety behavior.”

BBS “focuses on what people do, researches why they do it, and then applies research-supported strategies to improve what people do.” In this case, the focus would be on improving employee’s behavior when it comes to safety and making safety choices.

BBS

BBS “focuses on what people do, researches why they do it, and then applies research-supported strategies to improve what people do.” In this case, the focus would be on improving employee’s behavior when it comes to safety and making safety choices.

Human and Organizational Performance (HOP)

Human and Organizational Performance (HOP) is another “new” approach, or way to think about safety. HOP is a technique that aims to utilize the following:

  • Understand & use leading safety indicators to make changes that prevent injuries from occurring.
  • Minimize negative consequences and other strategies that drive the underreporting of incidents and near misses – The reporting of incident and near misses can drive where the safety focus needs to be.
  • Include the people who perform the “hands-on” and physical work to assist in identifying safety solutions.
  • Understand how humans perform and creating work “systems” that are more error tolerant.

HOP

“It is based on the premise that humans are error prone and that if we expect people to do things right all the time, we are most likely going to be disappointed – a lot!” – (Andrea Baker)

Does BBS & HOP really work?

When implemented correctly, BBS and HOP have had a huge impact on continuously improving managements support for safety, getting the involvement of all levels of employees input on safety, and through working together; finding ways to minimize poor behaviors and safety shortcuts that ultimately lead to injuries and fatalities.

Both BBS & HOP work hand in hand in their continuous strive to make safety improvements.  By implementing BBS and/or HOP workplaces can see a change in the following areas:

  • When “systems” or work practices fail – BBS and HOP assists in letting the employees understand why or where the system failed. Then, giving them the knowledge on what to “fix” or “change”.
  • Employees are no longer blamed following an injury. With BBS and HOP implemented – discipline should be extremely rare. Management and the employees should focus on the behavior or system that lead to the injury and focus on changing this.
  • Employees on the job/doing the job are given more voice in making safety improvements and improving safety systems.
  • Employee engagement will increase. Employees should want to start taking the initiative to correct safety hazards themselves when appropriate. They may want to help modify procedures to make a task safer. Employees can even be involved in conducting workplace audits and being included in incident analysis’.

Thinking of implementing BBS and/or HOP?

While all change comes with a “risk”, the proper planning and managing of a plan that is going to be implemented can be the result of success or failure.

Safety has been known to be a starting point for a “positive-change” that companies want to see. When properly planned and managed, a change in safety can lead to long lasting positive results.

When it comes to Behavior Based Safety and Human and Organizational Performance, there are a lot (& we REALLY mean A LOT) of studies out there that can aid in planning your implementation of either of these “new” techniques in your workplace. It is always smart to do plenty of research and come up with a team of individuals who will manage this new plan.

Start at the beginning – do your research, and come up with a plan. After that, master the plan and put it into place. You might be surprised where BBS and HOP can take your company!

By |2018-07-30T23:48:37+00:00February 26th, 2018|Blog Articles, Safety Management|