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So far LSCI has created 73 blog entries.

Recordkeeping & Reporting FAQs

Updated January 2019 What's Recordable? Each year, OSHA requires certain employers to complete the OSHA packet and have the 300A Summary form posted by February 1st. Filling out the OSHA 300 packet and also trying to determine what is, or is not considered a recordable injury can be confusing at times. For this reason, Lancaster Safety Consulting, Inc. (LSCI) hosts an annual Recordkeeping webinar which is available for free! Register for one of our webinars today by clicking here. Must-know OSHA Recordkeeping Basics: Q: Where can I find the OSHA Recordkeeping Packet? A: Download it here! Q: When does the OSHA 300A form need to be posted? A: February 1st to April 30th Q: Who is required to maintain injury and illness records? A: Employers

By |2019-01-15T14:23:39+00:00January 14th, 2019|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Top 5 Most Common Recordkeeping Mistakes

Recordkeeping Requirements Apply to Most Business in the United States OSHA requires employers who had 11 or more employees at any time during the calendar year to keep a record of serious work-related injuries and illnesses. These injuries and illnesses are recorded on 300 Logs, and if you’re an employer who is required to complete them, you may be already be aware of how to complete them. However, below are some common mistakes that employers make regarding recordkeeping. Let's start the countdown with the top 5 most common recordkeeping errors we see as Safety & Health Professionals: 1. Forgetting to Post the OSHA 300 A Form Employers who are required to complete 300 Logs

By |2018-12-28T21:54:34+00:00December 27th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

First Aid/CPR Requirements for Employers

Does OSHA Require First Aid/CPR Training? Many employers today wonder what the requirements are when it comes to training their employees in First Aid/CPR. Is it, or is it not required? Will employers be held liable or at fault if none of their employees are trained? What is the right thing to do? Many other questions that arise regarding training employees in First Aid/CPR are based off of the distance and time it would take medical services to get to a facility. In some cases, businesses are right next to a first responder, and in other cases it could take over 30-minutes for any emergency services to arrive. So, does everyone have to be

By |2018-12-28T22:05:56+00:00December 19th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

How Loud is a Construction Site?

Are You Protected Against Construction Site Noise? It’s no surprise that a construction site is one of the noisiest places to be in. While it may be a fleeting annoyance for pedestrians and passersby, construction noise impacts over 10 million construction workers on a daily basis. Sound intensity is measured in units called decibels (dBA). Prolonged exposure to sounds above 85 decibels can damage hearing and increase the likelihood of permanent hearing loss. According to Washington University’s Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Services, construction workers are exposed to over 85 dBA for 70% of their daily shift. Despite the hazards, construction workers report only wearing hearing protection devices for less than 20% of the

By |2018-11-28T16:29:42+00:00November 28th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, Safety Management|

Can you Really get Hurt at the Office?

The leading type of disabling accidents that occur within the office are the result of falls, strains, overexertion, falling objects, striking against objects, and being caught in or between objects. One would normally expect the office to have the least amount of hazards, but in reality, they are just as common as outside in the workplace. Fall into Safety! Falls are the most common office accident, accounting for the greatest number of disabling injuries. The disabling injury rate of falls among office workers is 2 to 2.5 times higher than the rate for non-office employees. Some of the more common causes of office hazards are as follows: Falls from tripping over an open desk

By |2018-10-19T16:24:56+00:00October 18th, 2018|Blog Articles, Safety Management|

Using Affirmative Defense With OSHA

Affirmative Defenses A defense in which the defendant introduces evidence, which, if found to be credible, will negate criminal or civil liability, even if it is proven that the defendant committed the alleged acts. From the perspective of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), an affirmative defense is a claim that if established and found to exist, can help to potentially rescind a citation that an employer received. Three Most Common Affirmative Defenses: Unpreventable Employee Misconduct or “Isolated Event” Defense Impossibility/Infeasibility of Compliance Defense Greater Hazard Defense Any defense you wish to argue must be brought up at the informal conference or hearing. If you raise an affirmative defense, the

By |2018-08-28T22:20:26+00:00August 28th, 2018|Blog Articles, Safety Management|

OSHA Requirements Guide for Employers

What Does OSHA Require From Employers? If you have ever visited OSHA's website, you know there is so much information posted regarding the different safety and health requirements employers must follow in order to keep their employees safe on the job. We are going to breakdown the key rules and regulations starting with the top 3 basic duties for employers. Three Key Elements: Compliance with OSHA laws. Provide a workplace free from serious recognized hazards. Examine workplace conditions to ensure compliance. The foundation of a successful safety program is compliance with OSHA laws. Part of the LSCI approach is to stress the importance of creating a good safety culture at your workplace.

By |2018-09-13T19:30:07+00:00August 15th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, OSHA News, Safety Management|

Crisis Response

Crisis Response that is Fast, Effective, and Direct Crisis response means taking action. It is the ability to be strategic with your response plan through careful monitoring and following through with established response protocols. You'll never be able to predict when a crisis will occur, but you can identify certain scenarios and plan how to appropriately respond in each type of event. Whether it’s a fire, unresponsive employee, chemical spill, active shooter, extreme weather, or a major machinery failure, the speed of your response and the actions you take may also turn into a Public Relations (PR) crisis, if mishandled. It’s important to pay attention to what is going on and use real time communication

By |2018-08-09T16:37:16+00:00August 9th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

Are You Posting Safety Violations Online?

Are Your Worksite Pictures Sending the Wrong Message? © Creative Commons Zero Social Media & Your Website Social media presence and influence has been on the rise for years. While OSHA is not actively searching company’s social media pages and websites for safety violations, you should still be aware of what you and your workers are posting. Not only could it be harmful or distasteful towards the company but it could represent a negative image. Don't Risk Posting Pictures With Safety Issues OSHA inspections are initiated by several factors, such as worker complaints, an emphasis program, or the reporting of an employee fatality or injury. They can also be prompted from the referral of another

By |2018-08-09T16:25:27+00:00August 9th, 2018|Blog Articles, Construction, General Industry, Safety Management|

OSHA’s Beryllium Final Rule

 Are You Exposed? What is Beryllium? Beryllium is a lightweight but extremely strong metal. Beryllium-copper alloys are widely used because of their electrical and thermal conductivity, hardness, and good corrosion resistance. Beryllium oxide is used to make ceramics for electronics and other electrical equipment because of its heat conductivity, high strength and hardness, and good electrical insulation. Metal slags and fly ash (a byproduct of coal-fired power plants) may also contain trace amounts of beryllium (<0.1% by weight). Who is Exposed? According to OSHA, around 62,000 workers are exposed to beryllium on the job. The most common industries that use beryllium include:   Aerospace   Telecommunications   Electronics   Medical   Energy   Defense OSHA's

By |2018-09-11T21:12:07+00:00July 3rd, 2018|Blog Articles, OSHA News, Safety Management|
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